Im only here to say one thing: Im incredibly sorry and that everything that I did was to make this a stronger and more beautiful community and to bring people together, he said.People didnt walk through those doors because it was a horrible place. People didnt seek us out to perform and express themselves because it was a horrible place. When asked if he was accountable, he said,No, Im not going to answer these questions on this level. next pageId rather get on the floor and be trampled by the parents. Id rather go to the website let them tear at my flesh… Almenas legal battles with some of the tenants and partygoers who visited the Ghost Ship are well-documented, but little is known about his life before he popped up in Oaklands underground art scene. Michael Allison saidhis daughter and Almena both grew up in Southern California andhave lived together as wanderers, organizing their lives around Burning Man and other festivals. They had an apartment for a time near MacArthur Park in Los Angeles, where Almena pursued photography and Allison belly danced. In the early 2000s, when Allison became pregnant with the couples first child, they decamped for Mendocino County, where they stayed with one of Almenas relatives. Michael Allison said that Almena worked as a marijuana grower, but that he mainly farmed out tasks to other people and didnt always pay them. I never saw any evidence of him beingphysically violent, but he did a lot of intimidating or threatening, said Allison, 60, of Portland, Ore., whonever warmed to Almena and said he and other relatives repeatedly tried and failedto persuade his daughter to leave him. By 2013, Almena and Allison had decided to make the warehouse their home.

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