— Nick Mangold ‘s sprained right ankle still isn’t right. The New York Jets center, injured nearly five weeks ago, watched the start of practice in street clothes Wednesday as the team began preparations for Sunday against the New England Patriots . It’s certainly not a good sign, especially after a bye week. Mangold, who missed only four games in his first 10 seasons, has sat out for three straight games. Many figured he’d benefit from the bye week and would be good to go, but this is clearly more than a typical ankle sprain. He was injured in Week 7 when teammate Ryan Clady rolled up the back of his leg against the Baltimore Ravens . Two weeks ago, Mangold admitted he suffered a setback, blaming his own “stupidity” for pushing himself too hard in his rehab. At the time, he sounded optimistic about his chances of returning at some point during the season even though he declined to specify the extent of the damage. In other injury news, cornerback Marcus Williams (high ankle sprain) still isn’t practicing. There’s a chance he will miss his second straight game.

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Bottom: images of a case in which… view more Credit: Images: Hokkaido University/Noa Co., Ltd. Hokkaido University researchers have developed a symmetry-recognition system for the surface of the human back that can three-dimensionally detect the early stages of idiopathic scoliosis, a type of spinal deformity, without the help of a specialist doctor. Individuals with idiopathic scoliosis, many of whom are pubescent girls, suffer from serious curvature of the spine. Click HereThe disease has a characteristically high affliction rate, affecting one in 50 people. Early detection of the progressive ailment is regarded as essential for treatment, as it is effective to wear a special brace when the spine is curved by 30 degrees or more. In recent years, genetic study of the disease has progressed, boosting the development of treatments. her responseIn accordance with stipulations in the Japanese School Health and Safety Act, elementary and junior high schools conduct physical check-ups aimed at detecting idiopathic scoliosis. However, the law leaves it up to the respective medical associations or education boards in each municipality to decide how to conduct the checks, giving rise to regional gaps in the detection rate.

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